Sumathi Narayanan Realty - Shrewsbury MA Real Estate, Grafton MA Real Estate, Ashland MA Real Estate


Buying a home is a beautiful feeling, but dealing with the financial aspect of it can be tiring. Well, thanks to mortgages, the financing is no longer a headache. From conventional to Government-insured mortgages, homeownership is now a dream that can be turned into reality once you have done your homework, arrived at a budget, reviewed your credit and nailed down your down payment amount.


The America government is not a mortgage lender but has been helping many Americans become homeowners. How? Through government agency loans, namely:

- Federal Housing Administration, also known as FHA, loans

- The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also known as USDA, loans

- U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, also known as VA, loans

This article will cover FHA loans: how they work, who is eligible, and everything you need to know about it. 


What Is an FHA Loan?

FHA loans give borrowers who do not have a significant down payment saved up and don't have good credit the opportunity to own a home. Since its inception in 1934, the FHA has insured over 40 million home loans.


Types of FHA Loans

FHA mortgagee loans come in different forms. Each form is dependent on your assets, income, age, and current home equity, should any be present. There are seven types of FHA loans:

- Fixed-Rate Purchase Loan

- Adjustable-Rate Purchase Loan

- Condominium Loans

- Secure Refinance Loan

- Home Equity Conversion Mortgages

- Graduated Payment Loan

- Growing Equity Loan


Closing Costs

Like other kinds of mortgage loans, FHA loans come with closing costs. However, expenses may be different depending on lenders, market conditions, geographic location, and down payments.

If you wish to lower your closing cost, you can do so by increasing your credit score, shop through multiple lenders, check for settlement and title companies, or negotiate with the lender you've selected.


FHA Loan Pros and Cons

FHA loans have many benefits such as low down payment, better interest rate, and credit score flexibility. The only downside of FHA loan is that you have to get mortgage insurance that stays with you throughout the life of your FHA loan.


What You need to qualify for an FHA Loan

You will need some form of identification to begin qualifying for an FHA loan. Driver licenses, military IDs, passports, or any other kind of government-issued ID is an acceptable form of identification. You'll also need your bank statements from the last two months and investment statements from the last two years. Be sure to have at least one month of pay stubs available, as well.

If you run a business or you are self-employed, you will be asked to provide:

- Your current tax year profit and loss statement 

- At least two of your recent tax returns

Talk to a mortgage and loan specialist to get the process started.


In real estate terminology, you may hear about various ratios and where you need to fall within the ratio to qualify for the home you want. A ratio simply expresses a relationship between two values: they compare two things, so a student/teacher ratio might be shown as 18:1, or one teacher for every 18 students. Different ratios apply to residential home buyers, investors, sellers, and lenders, but here are a few that might apply to you.

Loan-to-value or LTV

A comparison between the amount of a mortgage loan and either the home’s purchase price (for new buyers) or its appraised value (in a refinance) is its loan-to-value ratio. Lower LTVs typically qualify a buyer or homeowner a lower interest rate because there is less risk of default to the lender. So, a conforming mortgage with 20 percent down often garners a lower rate than an FHA loan with only five percent down.

Higher LTVs place more risk on the lender so if the market drops, the home could be “upside-down” or worth less than the amount of the mortgage.

Debt-to-income ratio or DTI

More important to home buyers is the debt-to-income ratio. Also called a debt-service ratio, it expresses how much money the borrower makes monthly compared to the monthly ongoing debt payments and obligations. A lender uses this figure to determine how high a mortgage payment you can handle. The first number is your income (gross) from your job, plus any other income that can be counted such as child support or a trust disbursement that you can use to make your mortgage payment plus taxes and insurance, and if applicable, association dues.

The second number uses the same calculation as the first plus any long-term debt such as a vehicle or school loan and consumer debt. This amount is the percentage of your income used to pay housing and long-term debt. So, a ratio of 30:37 (also written 30/37) means you spend 30 percent of all your income on housing with no more than seven percent obligated to debt service. That leaves you with 63 percent of your income for food, auto insurance, medical bills, clothing, and other expenses. Qualifying ratios adjust over time, but the Federal Housing Administration lists the qualifying ratio and the formula to determine it to qualify for an FHA loan.

Price-to-income ratio

Your DTI comes from your personal debts and income, and the LTV comes from a specific home's value, but the price-to-income ratio expresses the affordability of housing in a given locale. Most often, it is the ratio of the median home price to the median household disposable income. This ratio helps you determine if the home you want to buy is overpriced (it will be hard to sell) or under-priced (super good deal) for its geographical location. Lenders use this ratio as one additional factor in determining risk for that specific home.

To learn where your ratios fall and to determine if an area is right for your household budget, let your local real estate professional guide you.


If you're selling a home, having high quality photos is one of the most important things you can do to catch the eye of prospective buyers. Taking great photos, however, is something that requires a combination of frequent practice and knowledge of how your camera works. Sure, these days you can take a decent photo with an iPhone camera and be done with it. While that method is a good start, if you want to progress with your photography you'll eventually have to make the leap to a DSLR where you have more freedom to change exposure settings. I know what you're thinking. High quality photos means spending a ton of money on camera equipment, right? Fortunately, entry level DSLR cameras have become more affordable in recent years. To start taking great photos you'll only need four things: your DSLR camera, a tripod, a wide angle lens, and a place to practice your photography.

Step 1: Setting up

You'll want to set up the room with the right balance of furniture, decorations and natural light. Avoid decorations that are too personal (like family photos) or eccentric (no stuffed animals, preferably). Set up your tripod against one of the walls of the room. Ideally, you'll have the target of your photo illuminated by natural light coming through windows, so you'll likely be standing in front of or next to the windows. However, before you take any photos use your best judgment to determine the room's best angles. The amount of and the placement of furniture will play a large role in how spacious the room looks, but equally important is the camera angle from which you take your photos.

Step 2: Learn your camera settings

You won't learn all of the settings in a DSLR overnight, but it is important to get an understanding of the basics. In spite of the many technical improvements that have been made, the basic concept of a camera hasn't changed much over the years. The two main components that determine what your picture looks like are aperture and shutter speed. Aperture (or "f-stop") is what is used to determine how much light enters the camera. Much like your pupils dilate in the dark to let in as much light as possible, having a wide aperture will allow you to take brighter photos. Shutter speed is the amount of time the shutter on your camera is open. A slower shutter speed allows more light into the camera, creating a brighter exposure. However, due to our inability to hold a camera entirely still having a slower shutter speed creates more opportunity for your photo to become blurred from camera shake. A third important setting is the ISO. This setting is unique to digital photography because it controls the sensitivity of the camera's image sensor. The higher the number, the more sensitive. Why not just crank it up all the way then to get the best quality? Because if you set it too high the photos become grainy or "noisy."

Step 3: Practice

Now that you know the basics, start taking photos in your home using various camera settings. Play around with taking photos with different light sources on, with your camera flash on and off, and at different times of day. You'll find that there are endless possibilities when it comes to taking photos of your home.  

This Condo in Grafton, MA recently sold for $356,800. This Townhouse style home was sold by Sumathi Narayanan Realty - Sumathi Narayanan Realty LLC.


10 Violet Dr, Grafton, MA 01560

Condo

$389,900
Price
$356,800
Sale Price

7
Rooms
2
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Presenting this meticulously maintained 2 Bed 2.5 Bath townhouse in desirable Hilltop Farms Community. This beautiful end unit has two story cathedral foyer and gleaming hardwood floor in most area of 1st floor. Open floor plan with lots of natural light, formal dining area, large family room with celling fan and a gas fire place. Gorgeous kitchen with corian counter top, recessed lighting, stainless steel appliances and eat-in area. First floor master suite with full bath, dual sink, walk-in closet, Jacuzzi and a shower stall. Study/Office room in 1st floor. Second floor has large loft area and spacious bedroom with jack & jill full bathroom. Huge walk-out basement that could be finished for additional living area. Gas heat, central air, freshly painted, new carpet, excellent location, convenient access to major routes.

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Even the best real estate agents can't share important facts about your house the way that you can. You know what it's like to actually live in your house. Only you know if the refrigerator runs after the door has been open for at least a minute. You know if the house makes settling noises late at night. Soft spots in the floor, and how well the house heats during winter and cools during summer are more facts that you're privy to.

Sharing your house's inside history, builds buyer trust. But, be careful. As you share facts and history about your house, you might fall in love with your house all over again and start second guessing whether you should let your house go.

Home buyers want to do more than walk thru your house

When house shoppers start asking you about closing costs, if you have pets and when you'd like to move into your new home, it's time to start sharing important information with them. Doing so could speed up a house sale. Information to share includes:

The personality of the neighbors. Similar to how authors describe the personalities of characters in their bestselling novels, introduce potential buyers to the neighbors. Skim the surface, letting prospects know if neighbors are quiet, social or tougher to get to know. This is where having great neighbors pays off hugely.

Just as you'd let house shoppers know if you have pets, let potential buyers know if most of the neighbors have pets. If pets are well trained, not aggressive and stay in their yards, share this. It could put people who are uncomfortable around large pets at ease, especially if these potential buyers heard dogs barking as they drove up the street to your open house.

Don't keep house shoppers in the dark

Don't stop there. Tell house shoppers where malls and hit stores are, including how far these hot spots are from your house. If you live near hot spots, this alone could attract buyers who love being at the center of exciting events.

Although prospects will see key features about your house as they walk through it, they won't catch everything. Tell people who are interested in buying your house about the extra storage space that buyers can't see right away and often miss.

Have a finished basement or a finished attic? Let buyers know. It could make the difference between losing a house sale or closing a deal. Buyers may be looking for extra space that can be used as a guest room, extra bedroom or home office.

Show off gorgeous outdoor views. Share stories about renovations you performed on your house since you purchased it. Share stories about experiences you created at the house that caused you to love the house. For example, you could tell buyers that your first child was born in the house or that you started you operated your first business out of the house.

Let house shoppers know where nearby airports and other forms of public transportation like trains, subways and buses are. Buyers may not be a two-car family. Knowing that you live near reliable public transportation could seal the deal.

Talk with your real estate agent about inside history that you're considering sharing with potential home buyers. Do this before you speak with people who are interested in buying your house. Your realtor may have ideas on how you can present the history, offering house shoppers honesty and engagement.




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